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Buddhist Temples (In Indonesian: Vihara or Klenteng) in Jakarta

Han Thian Siang Tee Vihara Dharma Bhakti
Address: Jalan Palmerah Barat 5, West Jakarta.
    Review: A 18th-century temple. This well-maintained Buddhist temple is a fine example of the late 18th-century architecture. A quick look around reveals its original function as a Dutch mansion. Due to difficulties in maintaining the large estate, however, the premises was sold to an affluent Chinese family and later converted into a temple. Within the grounds lie the tombs of two important Muslim figures. Their burial here was intended to sustain good relationships between adherents of both faiths.

Vihara Dharma Bhakti
Address: 97 Jalan Kemenangan III, Central Jakarta.
    Review: Jakarta's oldest Buddhist temple dates back to 1650 and, interestingly, also draws followers of Confucianism and Taoism. Originally known as Jinde Yuan and built in honor of Kuan Yin, the Goddess of Mercy, it was destroyed in 1740 and later restored in 1755. The temple, with its bright red and yellow adornments, is home today to 18 Buddhist monks.
    Effigies and statues of deities fill the interior, and worshippers stream in regularly to pray for favors. The sharp smell of incense and burning candles can be overpowering for some visitors. Outside the main building, more statues stand in the side wings.

Vihara Dharma Jaya
Address: 48 Jalan Kemenangan III, Glodok-Kota, West Jakarta, 11120.
Phone: (62)(21) 315 4094 (Tourist Information)

Vihara Tanda Bhakti
Address: Gang 6 Jalan Kemenangan III, Next to Kali Krukut (Krukut River), West Jakarta, 11120.
    Reviews: This Buddhist temple was established in 1650 and dedicated to Kuan Yin, the Goddess of Mercy. The last major renovation took place in 1974. The complex comprises two temples - a principal temple and a small annex temple near the entrance.
    Designed in a Chinese tradition, the ceramic ceiling is decorated to represent the three virtues of happiness, prosperity and longevity. Most of the worshippers coming here are of Chinese descent. Admission: Donations recommended.

Vihara Da Bo Gong Ancol
Address: Jalan Pantai Sanur V, Ancol, Jakarta, 14430.
    Review: This Taoist temple is dedicated to Da Bo Gong, the god of earth and riches. One of Jakarta's oldest; it first occupied this site in the 1650's. The building underwent restoration several times, and the present structure dates from the 18th century. Antique wooden boards and stone tablets fill the interior, with one 1756 board bearing the names of prominent Chinese figures. The helmsman who initiated the temple's construction, Sampo Soeisoe, was buried with his Muslim wife under the main altar.

Vihara Dharma Jaya (Spirit of the wind)
Address: 48 Jalan Kemenangan III, Glodok, Jakarta.
    Review: This temple was built as a merchant temple for Da Shi, The Great Envoy, in 1751, and restored in 1978. It is also known as Feng Shan Miao or "The Temple of the Spirit of the Wind." It stands across the street from the 19th-century St. Maria de Fatima Catholic Church, offering an interesting contrast of cultures for visitors to explore. Inside the temple, visitors are welcome to donate offerings and make requests.

Vihara Lalitavistara Buddhist temple of the 1700s
Address: Jalan Cilincing Lama 3.
    Review: Located adjacent to Wan Lin Chie Purwah Rumah Penitipan Abu, a complex for storing cremains, this Buddhist temple was built in the 1700s. It has since undergone several major renovations, the latest in 1994. Typically Chinese design is featured throughout, with the dominant red color complemented by a scattering of gold ornaments. Among the gods honored here are Kuan Yin, Tat Mo Co Shu (Bodi Dharma) and Mi Le Hut, the Laughing Buddha. Admission is free, but permission is required.

Vihara Padumuttara Wen-Sahn Kuan Yin temple since 1805
Address: Jalan Bhakti
    Review: This large temple was built in 1805 by the Chinese community at Kota Cina (Chinese Town) in Tangerang, Banten. It blends in well with the Chinese-style houses and shops among which it is located. Among the deities honored are Kuan Yin, the Lohans, Kham Lam Ya and Kuan Kung. The Chinese believe that these deities are divine sources of mercy, courage and prosperity. On the birthday of Kuan Yin, the principal God, Chinese Indonesians gather here in hordes. Admission is free, but permission is required and cameras are not allowed.

Vihara Tanda Bhakti 17th-century Kuan Yin temple
Address: Gang 6 Jalan Kemenangan III. Next to Kali Krukut (Krukut River)
    Review: This Buddhist temple was established in 1650 and dedicated to Kuan Yin, the Goddess of Mercy. The last major renovation took place in 1974. The complex comprises two temples - a principal temple and a small annex temple near the entrance. Designed in a Chinese tradition, the ceramic ceiling is decorated to represent the three virtues of happiness, prosperity and longevity. Most of the worshippers coming here are of Chinese descent. Admission: Donations recommended.

Vihara Tri Ratna 300-year-old Buddhist temple
Address: Jalan Lautze 64, Pasar Baru.
    Review: This Buddhist temple was built 300 years ago in honor of the deities Thi Cong Wong Pho Sat and Kuan Yin. Its main gate is topped with three domes that symbolize the three dimensions of time: the past, the present and the future. A special room enables Buddhist disciples to place ancestral tablets of themselves and their ancestors. This is believed to guarantee a person a favored status as an ancestor in the present and future worlds upon his or her death.

Klenteng Sentiong Featuring Buddhist and Hindu statues
Address: Jalan Lautze 38, Pasar Baru, Jakarta 10710.
    Review: Set in a quiet and leafy garden, this temple of a unique Dutch-Indonesian architectural design was originally a Dutch colonial house. The first floor bears a traditional Indonesian style, the second floor a Dutch design, while the wooden staircase between the two levels features beautiful baroque-style carving. Its prominent red front door, however, is unmistakably Chinese. Unlike most other temples, this one houses a combination of Buddhist and Hindu statues. It serves devotees of both faiths.
 

 

 

 

 


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